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20110704
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/khrarpblgs us. you have the big main. usually there are 60 or a hundred or 50. the little guys are 20-15-30. if you want to shut off the power you shut off the little guys first than the main. when you throw a switch there is the arch. like water when water flows in an old house any you shut it off quick you get the hammer effect? that's like electricity. is it safe to do it if you smell natural gas? show of hands. >> nobody has their hands up. it's not safe to flicking any switches if you smell natural gas. how about if there is smoke coming out of an outlet. if you shut this off in an area where there is no gas, good idea. >> just about anything can be a hazardous material, cleaners, solvants, hair products anything can be hazardous. they are every where. the only time they are hazardous if they are misused our there is a disaster. do you see these in san francisco? that's probably propane. we have a port. in an industrial area. it identified where they are stored. are there hazardous storage places in this air? no. are there a dry cleaners? yes. who remembers grand auto. they ha
. that is why this decision was so appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for granted a law that there is a city government here. this was something that brought people together. you heard people talking about it at the cafes, park playground, people who do not always pay att
three or four weeks, we see a big tree case. i don't want palm trees on my treat. i want a six-foot box. everybody is very strongly felt about trees, i think. it happens constantly. >> it really brings out people's passions, which, as an -- as a forester, i'm always gratified to see. >> you're passionate. >> but this are also a -- oftentimes conflicts between trees and properties and developing a property, putting in a garage, you happen to have a tree in front of your house, you want to build a garage, you have to get a permit to take it out, we may not grant it automaticly, it can be a process that is challenging. >> we won't issue a permit to put in a garage or a curb cut, that requires a removal of the tree, until we get the tree removal permit first. so there's not a fate i've got my garage built and you can't have the tree standing in the way. >> used to happen a lot. the trees were, everybody forgot about us and then the garage was there, and people would say, you can't tell me i can't use my garage. >> then the little streets, how who is responsible for the trees and gardens and
have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in
in atlanta. entrepreneurship is a big part of it. i did not understand and nobody told me what is involved with buying your own home until i was in my second law school, where is the my counterparts, the white students i was in class with, they had had that information coming up. it was just second nature. i asked the guy across the hall from me what his folks did. but told him my mom was a nurse and my dad was a teacher, a soldier before. he said his father was the deputy prime minister of jordan. i was like, "ok." minute court partner -- my moot court partner, he said his father owned three swiss banks. i think even before entrepreneurship, it is financial literacy. we need to educate ourselves about what these resources are. it is financial literacy and really wealth literacy, understanding that there are different kinds of wealth beyond just monetary wealth, but you need to understand monetary wealth, spiritual well, the social capital we have and understand how to cultivate those things and invest them properly. those are important skills. at the same time, i do not think black capita
, and this becomes a very big problem of conscience for italian women. [speaking italian] [translator] i have a lot of friends who have just one child, but they are very sad to have not been able to see their child's first steps, to have not been able to follow their early stages of life, to see them grow up. because as long as they are growing, children need the presence of their mother. it gives them security. it creates people who are more secure in life. [man speaking italian] [translator] to think about having children today means it is something you really want to do. it is a decision, a choice. when you have decided that you want a child, work and other conditions become relative. having the child becomes the principal objective. if, on the other hand, you are not entirely sure that you want children, then you will find all the excuses in the world. you only need a problem at work, a financial problem, or one of many other little things which then become justification for not making the choice. in the end, they are just excuses. [patuelli speaking italian] [translator] let's say that we woul
were invited to perform in the presence in upstate new york for the holiday. it was not a big political thing. it was a holiday. we were just going to go and sing sing christmas carols, do some rap songs, whether we could do to cheer up the brothers that were locked up. we started to do it over and over again. it was only 10 years later and that we began to see ways to use that in a more pro-active way. we would come out of a nightclub in new york city, my brother, my cousin, and i. we had had some experience with the police harassing us on the streets. this particular night, somebody had gotten into a fight, we were probably the only black folks in a white neighborhood the party that they were at, they were playing salsa, marvin gaye, and we were hanging out after the birthday party. we got caught up in a situation where the police had been called for shots fired. we happened to be the only black people there, they got us and put us in jail. that was the first day that you mentioned. the long and short of it is, i was in my second year of law school at the time. i am reading all these
to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credit union delinquent rate is quite low because we are working with a client. we want to keep that low and as part of our mission. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans.
are happening, and, like,'"8 health and all that -- those essential stuff that people need. also, have a big pool of money where every time somebody wants to create an organization or something to help youth, they will have the ability to create it. >> my main point was to mobilize the youth vote. even though i know many of you guys cannot vote, those ages have one of the lowest turnout rates for voting. compared to older people and especially those over 60, it really makes a difference because for example, politicians never talk about cutting social security or medicare because they know it would alienate one of the biggest voting platforms, which is older people. if more youth spoke up, they would not cut from education and stuff like that. >> more focus on education, also diversified education for youth. transitional services, restorative justice, and no tax cuts for the wealthy, so more funding for the less wealthy. >> also, one i have is just to be prioritizing, like someone else said earlier, like pulling out our troops from war and putting money that we would save from divesting in wa
became "special circumstances," story of a murder in a big law firm. it came out in 2000 and spent seven weeks on "the new york times"' bestsellers' list. so for those of you who have bought my books, i thank you, because now i don't have to practice law full-time anymore. >> but all kidding aside, you know, i think crime novelists and readers of crime novels whether it's lawyer books or whether it's private detectives or cops, you know, in my world i'm like -- unlike tony's, i can control the outcome. i can get justice in my books because i can fix the ending. and i start -- and most authors do i start with the ending. i know who did it, how and why. and by god, when i write that book, i'm going to make sure justice is served. i think that's why people keep coming back to lawyer books in particular because there's a lot of drama in the courtroom. there's always a murder. there's always big stakes. i've written books about death penalty cases. the stakes don't get any bigger than that. and i think it was important to me to have the center of my books a defense attorney who is the kind of
a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from outside. they only come if it is nice to live in your city. k4they were trying to reduce te parking, which was 10%. we went into negotiation with the employers' organizations and with employers, telling them that it is not only a problem of the public, but also a problem of their own companies. it worked. after half a year of talking, 17 companies directly signed the agreement, also some americans among them.
. as jones has said, "living and dying is not the big issue. "the big issue is what you're going to do with your time while you're here." his memoir, last night on earth, whose title was taken from one of his performances, was published in 1995. last year, bill t. jones joined the naacp protest against the flying of the confederate battle flag over the south carolina state house by boycotting the spoleto festival and canceling his dance company's two-day engagement. he recently received the lambda legal defense fund liberty award. jones has noted that speaking about his work could historically overshadow the work itself. we hope that's not the case and certainly look forward to our conversation this evening. welcome. hello. [applause] we're delighted to have you here. as you know, this show is about free expression, and i'm curious: are there things you can convey in dance that you can't convey in other forms of communication? mmm. well, i suppose that was the reason i became a dancer. i was an actor, or a wannabe actor, and till one day i was encouraged at the university to come and t
the first place winner, mr. wes tyler of union square. wes? big mystery. who's the winner. >> by the process of elimination, it's koit! >> koit. mr. scotty bastopol for the third year in a row. love this city. thank you. >> runners up. the 47th not -- annual cable car bell ringing competition, no particular order, mr. trini whitaker. sullivan philips. ken lunardi. and joseph hsu. come up and get your trophies. thank the judges. [laughter] now it's time for what you've been waiting for, third place, ladies and gentlemen, mr. howard woo. howard woo. again, they're not booing you. all right. mr. ken mcdonald. chief of muni operations officer, please come forward to help me present the second place trophy. second place, ladies and gentlemen. mr. frank ware. and before we announce the winner i'm going to drag this out even longer. i'm going to take a moment to thank the kind people who made the 47th annual cable car bell ringing contest possible the the vice chair of the sfmt board of directors. and friends of the cable car music, union square association, trophy masters shanghai restaurant, ghir
operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is there a fire, yes or no, damage, are there people injured, dead, can you get there. where, what, any sort of damage, are there people involved, can you get to it? here is a nert status sheet. basically if you send somebody out, you want to send the members' names, what time they went out, when they came back, what the assignment was, any comments, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't come back within a couple hours we have to send somebody to find them or at least checkup on them. if we don't know where they went and who they are, you have chaos. they might be hurt and they're going to stay hurt. we're going to roll on to disaster psychology. what does t
, "this is what we told you it was. this is from here. and this is where it comes from." and that's a big deal. information is a big deal. >> the restaurant has an extremely busy kitchen. but to mills, who's in his sixties, it's like home from home. he knows about the stresses chefs face, since he used to be one. for 14 years, he was the head chef for randy parary restaurants in sacramento. today, he's traded in his chef's hat to promote, educate, and even celebrate produce with other chefs. >> i use email. i use the phone. but the best thing to do is to be able to go into a restaurant, to go into the kitchen, to find the person cooking the food, and say, "hey, what can i get you? what are you looking for?" >> i would just be doing seed production if it weren't for jim driving in here and refusing to drive away and sayin "no, i really want this stuff. no, you don't understand, i really do want to buy this stuff." and "i really want this, and i really want it now, and i really want some, and i wnt samples," and you know, so forth and so on despite my best efforts to get rid of him. >> as c
's a medical, is it a big hurt or a little hurt? is it a rescue situation and if it's a fire, do you have the resources to control or extinguish that fire? how about your situation, do you have all your people? do you have all the resources that you need? have you collected all the material that you need if you are going to start doing a lifting exercise because someone is trapped? because you never start a rescue, you never start a lifting exercise, never start anything, unless you know you are going to be able to finish it, have enough of the resources to do it. and do you have the right equipment? you need specialized equipment? do you have access to that? maybe, maybe not. so size up, you want to establish your priorities, make your decisions. you want to come up with a plan and after you have a plan, you want to take action. remember, it's continuous fact gathering process. you want to evaluate your progress. there are 50 percent of the people can be rescued by who? this is where you come in for the next 30 percent to make it 80 percent of the people. the next 30 percent of the peopl
black people. that big fight, brown versus the board of education so all the black kids can get an education. [inaudible] the books have pages missing, and they all have things written inside of them. at the main library, we have a demonstration going on. [inaudible] how come we cannot use that facility? they cannot even get a good job and fair pay. men, they come up missing. rape -- they do not want to talk about that, but if it is a white woman, it is on the news, on the radio, on television. i do not want to die like that. so i'm going to stay black and die. if i could do one thing -- >> i told you, you need to move on. do i need to get the police?" >> sir, i picked -- "sir, i paid my fare. it is my constitutional right." the driver gets off the bus. police officers come. they are at the back door. "i had trouble with this girl before." "the two of you need to get up. you know it is against the law." open " i paid my fair -- "i paid my fare. if i move now, i will get sick. i'm pregnant." there is a volunteer. i think he was sensing there was going to be trouble or something.
francisco's i is a big important city. you have access to your mayor, to supervisor cohen, president of the board of education, and a lot of people. these other people that make the decisions. we'll let you know what we have done so there is not just one opportunity but multiple opportunities. >> [inaudible] >> the media process, the national one is going to be done a little bit quicker than that. there'll be an indication of the next couple of months about what we have learned a we can do with the information to happen to come back earlier than annually to continue the dialogue. >> how does the process of the other services other than housing hopefully here in san francisco? >> affects all properties. if you have an apartment or a home and you have been discriminated against, we can take action. in housing decisions, where you live as an impact on some the other things. what your access is the hospitals, healthy foods, playgrounds, etc. pierhead as a platform for advancement and empowerment, it is really important. is is an indirect way of dealing with education issues. it is also j
or big business. you had a lot of candidates on an even keel. what i felt quickly was the strategy to being successful was to build coalitions, and also to approach your communication in a multi land will approach. in my district, it is one of the most ethnically diverse parts of san francisco. we incorporated that. my campaign team was diverse. i had seniors. i had young people. i had different types of volunteers. i had folks that could speak chinese, spanish, someoan, all reaching out to bring people in. there is a certain level of malta and -- of momentum that help people. i would never ask my volunteers to do something i was not willing to do. we were at the bus stop at the morning handing out literature. i think that is critical, to bring into city hall that, yes, i am elected to lead, but more importantly to serve. that is my number one focus point. i am here to serve. when you call me, i am at 4 service. >> what about issues facing san francisco, facing your district, and how you are going to balance the needs of san francisco at large against the needs of your district? >>
so we don't cut a big root. we try to preserve as many roots as we can. >> the path of travel, the city has a minimum travel standard, i believe it is 48 inches. >> it is. >> we easily maintained thap about we see where trees encroach on that or are tripping hazards. >> we never want to go less than 48 inches in the path of travel, ideally, it is more than that, but if it is scrult of losing or keeping a tree we'll shrink down to whatever we need to. >> let's move around the corner, to this. see if we can get in the shade over here. here we have one of those trees. what kind of yuke lip tass is this? >> this is the dollar one. >> i remember that from my tree classes. >> warren knows as much as do i, he's just in the wrong department. we're going to recruit him. >> so, what they call silver dollar. the leaves are the shape and size of silver dollars. silver dollar. >> this is another tree that we see fairly often in san francisco, although, not a tree that we, currently recommend as a street tree, but we'll never take out a tree because it is the wrong species. it, there has to
partners. this is a big thank you to microsoft for investing in our kids. before i start, i want to work knowledge a couple of people. our director of san francisco education and a wonderful partner. kimberly is here with her team. marie from the school district, and laurie, who heads our bridge to success program. these are folks that are making all of this happened. thank you for being here. i would like to welcome our host and chancellor from city college to welcome you and opened this up, dr. don griffin. [applause] >> thank you for being here today. i hope you are excited about mission campus. this is one of our finest campuses, but do not be fooled -- we have nine others, most of which are larger than this. we are very excited about you being here. one, i think you made a commitment to go to college, and college has made a commitment to you. we are trying to, this summer for the summer bridge, make college real for you. in other words, so there is no getting lost or confused about how to get financial aid, counseling, and all those things. this program here is for the students. we
. a big part of what we do is the technical assistance and counseling work we do for folks interested in starting a business or those in the early stages who really need advice about where to go when you run into the wall, about financing, marketing, managing your business. that is an important role we play as well. another role we play is helping small businesses understand how to do contract thing, particularly with the federal government, but in a more general way, with all the public sector players. one of the things that small businesses always need is customers. one of the big customers out there is the public sector, but one of the challenges is the public sector on every level, federal, state, and local, are always difficult for small businesses to understand how to navigate the process of getting certified to do business, finding the right sources to be able to talk to and understand how to navigate getting into the contract thing rolls with public sectors, so we try to help small businesses understand that, and we partner with a lot of organizations -- the city, the state of
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
sunday on the big screen. it will not always capture that. if you want to push the revolution now and start handing of guns, you might shoot me, right? we do not have an understanding of exactly what needs to happen and how it needs to happen. i think education is critical. we have to push for an education that we're just not receiving for the most part. there are pockets of that happening, but i think that awareness will produce the next scenario -- the next generation of folks in entertainment, in the arts and all these arenas that are high-profile but with the embedded with this consciousness that will demand the stand up and say something. no more of the michael jordan cannot speak out because politics is not a good thing to speak out against. it will be the jamaican musicians, the peter toshes and bob marleys -- the people -- the politicians had to be responsive to what people were saying and doing because there was a movement around these high- profile folks. they cannot just represent the movement. they have to come out of the movement. it has to be present in our communiti
. this was a big deal getting married. we have talked to people together for 38, 40 years. they are excited and nervous. >> once we figured a way to have a security area for appointments for license and ceremony. we looked at the north light court how it's structured. how people would come in and the work flow of that area. there is a check-in area in front of the central entrance and they would verify their appointments and they would proceed. >> my wife who works for the city told me they were looking for volunteers. and that's me. so, i was interested in helping out. and i think it's those people that have been together for a long time that are the most moving story. i am sure the young people appreciate, the more you appreciate the change. >> i think what's also moving is the fact that everyone that works in the city is enthusiastic. everybody in city hall. they are very excited and behind the whole change going into affect. >> i just got an email. i work for the san francisco public library. they needed volunteers. it was something i wanted to do. i have friends who have been married.
write novels about the types of cases that lawyers like tony handle. in the daytime i work for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. iwr
an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people each. putting out the fires. you will go into a dark room and doing a search. you will be treating people with injuries on them. be doing privying. lifting heavy objects off of a doll and giving iv and turning off util
day our members show courage in bay area courts, and we do ok in the big battles as well. who will ever forget the extraordinary accomplishments of john in defending our college, patrick, from a crazy federal prosecutor in nevada? that level of talent and that level of courage is unique, but every day criminal courts in the bay area shine because my colleagues from ctla are working there. recently ctla issued a public statement against the death penalty. ctla joins other groups and individuals here today in calling for permanent incarceration as california's alternative to the death penalty. this city and county has a great san francisco public defender and we want to express our thanks to jeff adachi for his support of ctla over the years and for his gratitude for being here today. thank you for your taxi and have a great conference -- thank you for your attention and have a great conference. [applause] >> i also want to acknowledge the public defender, past-present president of the california lawyers association. thank you for being here. now, we have our 50th anniversary tr
this was a big conspiracy to frame this man. what i learned is -- and i discussed this with geronimo -- we are experiencing men and women who thought the end justified the means. they thought they had a bad man and it was ok to do anything necessary to convict him. as i look back on my career, present and future, i think we see that that is the concept that runs through police misconduct. i am sure there are officers who were just bad, let's say. i think officers see what they consider bad people, and they feel like they have to do what ever it takes to convict them. and i have seen it when i was a young lawyer, when we had narcotics teams, we would get clients to said they arrested me with $20,000 and they said i only had $10,000. and we knew there were telling the truth. it i have seen it with law- enforcement officers in the case where a rogue cop shot a young girl, and the four other officers were all good men. remember -- you talk about misconduct, but primarily -- i want to get back to this -- most law enforcement people i have grown to know in my career are good and i think want to
as their customers. and that is a big change, because before they were the enemy. >> the situation in the netherlands is completely different. cyclists are not encouraged to take their bikes on public transport. it is especially forbidden to have normal bikes and rush hour. the reason is because of 4% of the clients of public transport of trains, by bike. what they provide for our enough bicycle parking and the possibility to take a bite from the station to where you want to go -- and the possibility to take a bicycle from the station to where you want to go to with a public transport bicycle. they say, we do not want to take the bike on the train, only for recreational purposes. on sunday, it is quite easy to take your bike. outside, it is only folding box and a provide enough bike parking. >> the public transport bicycle at the end of the trip, it is that a bike share program? is that a transit program? >> it is a bicycle sharing program. the bikes are not free. the cost 2.85 euros per day to use it. but it is growing very popular. >> on the issue of bikes and transit, in the u.s., a traditionally
at that table to really create policies that will minimize that san francisco is not a big business-friendly city. i think we started to go in the wrong direction. the reason why we started walking down that path largely was because of political ideology. when you deal with me, you are dealing with facts, less than politics. i really want to have a positive impact on the city overall. >> good afternoon, everyone. how are you? >> good. >> it's a nice day today. thank you for coming out to our community event. please give a round of [applause] to them. we have a lot of development going on. you see how lovely leland street looks. do you like it? >> yes. >> beautiful, isn't it? we are going to continue. we have a library that is going to be opening up in june. that's right. so i will see you all there at the library. there is a lot of activity going on. it is important we remain connected and engaged. >> would you mind if we were to pull the seniors together and translate for me in a mini meeting? >> yes, sir. >> what we are going ready to do is we are going to have a quick little mini
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)